• Register


Information for users from the old Q&A site
If you have an account from our old Q&A site, your account was transferred over, but you need to reset your password and confirm your email address.
Reset Password here
Confirm Email here

1,762 questions

3,101 answers

793 comments

7,756 users

Dead Sea, Unidentified Mineral Stone

0 votes

Hello, I found a stone, It was found in the dead sea and has been confirmed not to be a salt crystal. I believe this stone has not yet been identified by science, and deserves an analysis, of its molecular makeup and how it was formed. I would like to send you an image or two of it for you to determine if my theory is true, unfortunately there are some problems with uploading images using this site. I would be very thankful if you would give me an email address where i could send you images. Sincerely, Avihu D Ohana

asked Dec 23, 2014 by aviwhoo (360 points)

9 Answers

0 votes

What specific problems did you have uploading the images? Also, you mentioned that you had it confirmed not to be a salt crystal. What analysis was this based on? Can you please provide additional info on this analysis?

answered Dec 24, 2014 by hershel (46,480 points)
0 votes

alt text Here are a few images of the stone. I determined it was not a salt crystal using a taste test, it has no salty properties, it is neutral. So far I've had no professional help determining its variety. Although i can provide all other necessary info.

answered Dec 24, 2014 by aviwhoo (360 points)
0 votes

alt text

answered Dec 24, 2014 by aviwhoo (360 points)
0 votes

Not yet been cleaned of dead sea residue

answered Dec 24, 2014 by aviwhoo (360 points)
0 votes

3.4 KG

answered Dec 24, 2014 by aviwhoo (360 points)
0 votes

This item has not been cleaned, in the photo, it still has dead sea residue. Therefore the image may not be as clear/clean as it would be if it were to be checked

answered Dec 24, 2014 by aviwhoo (360 points)
0 votes

It looks like calcite. The area surrounding the Dead Sea is composed of limestone, and there are many cave formations in the region (i.e. Qumron). The 2nd picture you posted definitely gives the look of a cave-like formation. You can easily test this by checking if it bubbles up if you place some acid on it.

answered Dec 25, 2014 by hershel (46,480 points)
0 votes

i dropped in a decent size piece into a shot glass filled with distilled white vinegar and it didn't bubble. Am i using the right acid?

answered Dec 26, 2014 by aviwhoo (360 points)
0 votes

See if you can get a stronger acid. The best solution is to get a hold of muriatic acid or lime out from a large hardware store, and place it in an old medicine bottle dropper, and apply acid from the dropper on the specimen.

Make sure to be careful when dealing with strong acids since the fumes are toxic.

answered Dec 26, 2014 by hershel (46,480 points)

Related questions

0 votes
0 answers
asked Sep 25, 2016 by Indy (120 points)
0 votes
4 answers
asked Aug 3, 2012 by Mourning_Star (720 points)
0 votes
1 answer
 


...